Tuesday, December 31, 2013

A Therapist's Resolutions

Everyone is reflecting this time of year and thinking of the year that's passed and the future to come. People are setting (hopefully reasonable) resolutions for themselves for the next year and celebrating successes.

This year's successes have included:

  • The publishing of my second book, Bubble Wrap Your Kids, a parenting guide for the prevention of childhood trauma
  • Some added success in marketing my practice including joining a mastermind group. Said mastermind group is also planning travelling 2-day presentations for next year. 
  • I bought and renovated a house this year, which has been expensive. 
  • I've also begun teaching college this year, which has been interesting. 
  • Some of you know I also started another business this year wherein I'm producing a game that should be available in just a few months in physical (dice) form and an app. 

Lots of busy-making things, all of which I'm proud of and require my continued nurturing.

In the next year, I resolve to work weekly on the following goals:

  1. Be available to friends and family and reach out to those I don't see as often.
  2. Be present. 
  3. Be mindful of diet/exercise and doing what my body needs.
  4. Manage time cautiously and waste a little less during my set work hours. This will help me to meet my deadlines and not feel stress from being rushed.
  5. Put energy toward 2 more books (one on RRT® and therapy and one on etiquette in the modern age - send me your suggestions/comments/questions).
  6. Spend time growing my practice including doing a pro bono project.
  7. Give more presentations and do more public speaking.
  8. Produce the game and keep working on other games - there are a few in progress. 
  9. Pay off the debt to the house and do additional house projects. Spend mindfully.
  10. Spend some time on Twitter for my businesses. 

I hope our resolutions overlap and our combined energy expands to fuel our mutual transformations! Have a prosperous new year.

To support my various projects, follow me at:
Clear Mind Group, Facebook & Twitter, and refer your friends/coworkers/family
Butter Knife Concepts, Facebook & Twitter
Amazon
Email your questions or thoughts on etiquette or on RRT therapy

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on Twitter and Facebook. Subscribe on the right under Follow by Email for the weekly blog delivered directly to you.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Dreams and Thoughts and Meaning

What does it mean when you dream about bears, snakes, your teeth falling out, falling, or having sex with your grandparents?

http://catghost.net/2011/04/12/rem-sleep/
One way to think of this is that symbols pop up while you are unconscious and have meaning to be interpreted and dissected to understand the deeper meaning behind them. Lots of people think this way and do just that.

Another way of thinking of this is to say that things are brought to your awareness (even your unconscious awareness such as when you're sleeping) because you saw or heard something that reminded you of that symbol in some small associated way. So if you passed a Toys'R'Us yesterday, it made you think of Geoffrey Giraffe, their mascot, and that's why a giraffe may have been in your dream. Or maybe it made you think of bicycles because you once got a bike from the store next to a Toys'R'Us and that's why you dreamed of a giraffe riding a bike, or of flying bicycles.

I don't know if either of those ways is "right", but I believe that I get an allotted amount of energy at any given moment and I choose not to attach or search for meaning in things that happened during my unconscious state. If your mind has been attaching meaning to some thought you had randomly and it's been disturbing to you, make an appointment to get that cleared up and reclaim your energy for all the fun stuff you'd rather be doing than ruminating on that bothersome thing.

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on Twitter and Facebook. Subscribe on the right under Follow by Email for the weekly blog delivered directly to you.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Credentials - What's an LMHC?

The world of psychological credentials is confusing to laypersons. Here is your handy guide:

LCSW
A licensed clinical social worker has at least a master's degree and has passed the state or national exam. There is a minimum amount of continuing education to be done each year to maintain good standing with the state, who oversees this license.

LMHC
A licensed mental health counselor has at least a master's degree and has passed the state or national exam. There is a minimum amount of continuing education to be done each year to maintain good standing with the state, who oversees this license. The benefit of seeing an LMHC over an LCSW is that the LMHC can see an individual, that individual's spouse and family and be within our code of ethics. An LCSW is not allowed to see individuals who are also patients as a couple or a family due to their code of ethics.

LMHC-RI or LSCW-RI
The "RI" refers to the person being a registered intern for one of those professions. The state is aware that the practitioner is learning and is under supervision for a period of time and then can apply for licensure after that time is completed successfully. Registered interns are not allowed to be in private practice on their own, but they are allowed to have their own caseloads of clients, even seeing clients individually.

LPC
A licensed professional counselor is a psychotherapist who may have a social work degree or a mental health counseling degree. This designation is used in certain states, not including Florida.

NCC
A nationally certified counselor is a psychotherapist who may have a social work degree or a mental health counseling degree. This designation is used nationally. I am not sure if the practitioner also needs a state license or not.

Psychiatrist
A psychiatrist has a medical degree and a doctorate. They are able to prescribe medications like any other medical doctor. Most psychiatrists spend about 15 minutes with a patient to check for medication side-effects or assess for increasing or decreasing dosages. Typically, they do not give therapy. Psychiatrists must maintain a state license, just like a doctor.

Psychologist
A psychologist has a doctorate degree but do not prescribe medication and I think have very little, if any, medical training. Many psychologists have a PsyD instead of a PhD, which means they have a clinical specialty. This is often a more appropriate specialty for providing counseling. Psychologists must maintain a state license, just like a doctor.

Life Coach
A life coach is NOT a therapist. They cannot legally provide psychotherapy (therapy). Life coaches can help you with choosing direction in life in the way that a worldly friend might. Life coaches have to take a training course to become certified, but I don't think they are required to have any education in counseling at all. I do not know if the state oversees life coaches, but my hunch is they do not.

CHt
A certified hypnotherapist (or certified clinical hypnotherapist) has a minimum amount of training in the specialty of clinical hypnosis to become initially certified, and an amount of training each year to maintain certification. There are many types of hypnotherapy and you should ask about their given specialty to see how this will fit for your case. The board that oversees hypnotherapists is national, not a state agency.

Hypnotist
A hypnotist can be anyone trained in either clinical or stage hypnosis. A hypnotist does not need any counseling training and is not necessarily a therapist. Hypnotists are allowed to work with "minor" issues like weight loss, quitting smoking, motivation, and things you might go to a clinic to do without doing any underlying issues work. A hypnotist is not allowed to give therapy. Be cautious about asking about their training and what sort of issues they cover. Too broad a scope is a warning sign that they may be practicing outside of their scope of work. The state does not oversee this specialty, so be careful.

CP
A certified practitioner (or master certified practitioner) has at least 50 hours of training per year in Rapid Resolution Therapy® (RRT) and may or may not be a licensed clinician. Again, one can be a hypnotist and a CP. Do check what other licenses the practitioner holds before you book an appointment.

I am a licensed mental health counselor, certified clinical hypnotherapist, and a certified practitioner in RRT.
Autumn Hahn, LMHC, CHt, CP

Autumn Hahn is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist practicing at Clear Mind Group in Weston, Florida. Call 954-612-9553 for a consultation. Follow Autumn on Twitter and Facebook. Subscribe on the right under Follow by Email for the weekly blog delivered directly to you.